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RKT BMR
05-04-2005, 09:42 PM
I have a flaky exhaust cam sensor (M42 motor in a 2001 E46 cab), and have had a replacement sitting in my garage for a year. The reason I haven't put it in is because I stripped the inside of the hex screw that holds it on back when I first tried to replace it, and then the stock part started behaving again, so I set the project aside.

It's acting up again, so I want to get that damn thing out of there. I tried slotting it with my dremel so I could turn it with a screwdriver -- no luck. Can't get a pair of pliers in there easily to get a grip on it either. Maybe I'll post a pic (and maybe I won't -- too lazy :)), but any of you that are familiar with the part I'm talking about here and it's location at the front left of the motor under the VANOS control assembly know what I'm dealing with to try and get purchase on this screw and get it out -- without a workable hex wrench solution.

So, I was thinking of just cutting the head off with my dremel, remove the sensor, then wrestle out the remainder of the screw with a pair of pliers. Should be easier without the sensor there. Wanted to get feedback from others before I did this, and any other ideas/suggestions before I take the plunge.

I do have a replacement screw, BTW.

Optimus Prime
05-04-2005, 10:04 PM
I have a flaky exhaust cam sensor (M42 motor in a 2001 E46 cab), and have had a replacement sitting in my garage for a year. The reason I haven't put it in is because I stripped the inside of the hex screw that holds it on back when I first tried to replace it, and then the stock part started behaving again, so I set the project aside.

It's acting up again, so I want to get that damn thing out of there. I tried slotting it with my dremel so I could turn it with a screwdriver -- no luck. Can't get a pair of pliers in there easily to get a grip on it either. Maybe I'll post a pic (and maybe I won't -- too lazy :)), but any of you that are familiar with the part I'm talking about here and it's location at the front left of the motor under the VANOS control assembly know what I'm dealing with to try and get purchase on this screw and get it out -- without a workable hex wrench solution.

So, I was thinking of just cutting the head off with my dremel, remove the sensor, then wrestle out the remainder of the screw with a pair of pliers. Should be easier without the sensor there. Wanted to get feedback from others before I did this, and any other ideas/suggestions before I take the plunge.

I do have a replacement screw, BTW.

I had a similiar situation and I happend to have more than a few, spare, crappy, allen wrenches of the same size. I took JB weld and coated the end of the allen wrench and stuck it in the head of the screw. I rigged something up to keep it in place for a day or so and then came back and backed it out no problem.

RKT BMR
05-04-2005, 10:09 PM
I had a similiar situation and I happend to have more than a few spare crappy allen wrenches of the same size. I took JB weld and coated the end of the allen wrench and stuck it in the head of the screw. I rigged something up to keep it in place for a day or so and then came back and backed it out no problem.

I like that better. Hex wrenches are cheaper than the 90deg attachment I'll have to get for my dremel to pull this off anyway.

Why didn't I think of that? :shock:

bren
05-04-2005, 10:14 PM
Craftsman drill-out/screw out extractor (http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid=00 952157000)

lip277
05-05-2005, 12:04 AM
Craftsman drill-out/screw out extractor (http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid=00 952157000)

Right - Those are commonly known as 'easy outs'. We use them all the time in building airplanes (you'd be surprised how often the mechanics goof up the heads of fasteners)


Good luck

RKT BMR
05-05-2005, 11:12 AM
Craftsman drill-out/screw out extractor (http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid=00 952157000)

Right - Those are commonly known as 'easy outs'. We use them all the time in building airplanes (you'd be surprised how often the mechanics goof up the heads of fasteners)

Heh heh... those are some of the most expensive bits I've ever seen... I wonder why :) :)

Roadstergal
05-05-2005, 01:23 PM
I dub this thread The Joy Of Hex.

Optimus Prime
05-05-2005, 01:26 PM
I dub this thread The Joy Of Hex.
You don't think about much else, do you?